Google Sheets: How to create a task completion check sheet.

Google Sheet: IMPORTRANGE, IF, TODAY, conditional formatting, tick box, alternating colors, protect sheet and ranges, share sheet 

Sometimes you have teams, staff or students who all need to complete reports and tasks by a certain date, but you need a way to keep track of when the reports are complete so that you can compile them later.

The following tutorial is a simple tick box-based Google Sheet that the user ticks when they have finished writing their quarterly report. I use something like this in my day to day to keep track of a number of reporting processes.

This is very much a follow-along guide for Google Sheet Beginners to help develop some basics skills and think about how to design Sheets for the workplace. Feel free to read what you need or skip to the end for a link to the google sheet for you to make a copy of.

Here is what we will complete by the end of the tutorial.

Task completion check sheet google sheets

If the user’s tick box had not been ticked in Column ‘C’, Column ‘D’ will automatically report Overdue in red and Column ‘E’ will report the number of days overdue.

There is a space set aside for administration to note the reminders that they have sent to the user and the last date the reminder was sent. Admin can easily copy the emails and send a message to those staff who have not completed their report by the deadline.

Let me walk you through the workflow for creating this:

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Google Apps Script: Get the last row of a data range when other columns have content like hidden formulas and check boxes

Google Apps Script: getRange, getLastRow, getDataRange, spreadsheetApp – requires a basic understanding of GAS

Finding the last row of a data range in Google Sheets using Google Apps Script is a pretty common task. We often do this to find the next available free row to insert new data or to copy an entire data range to put into an array in Google Apps Script.

Generally, for fairly clean data, or a small range of data, we would rely on two approaches to get the data we need:

  • getLastRow(): this will get the last row in a Google Sheet that has data in it. It determines the last row based on the last available row value in all columns in the spreadsheet.
  • getDataRange(): this will get the range up to the last row and column with values in it.

Let’s take a quick look at this clean data set:

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Google Sheets: How to hide formula error warnings where there is no data or the data divides by zero

Google Sheets, IFERROR, ISBLANK, IF

Have you ever set up a Google Sheet with formulas that you drag all the way down to the bottom? See all those messy error values littering your otherwise immaculate spreadsheet when those formulas don’t reference a value? It sucks, right?

Formual errors referencing empty values Google Sheets

What if I told you that you could hide all those messy errors? What if I told you that you could truly have that pristine nirvana that you have been imagining that your Google Sheet project would truly be?

Drink the Kool-Aid and strap in, my friends, as your very own guru in a goat takes you on a journey of enlightenment into hiding formula error when:

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Google Apps Script: Send Bulk Emails and Share a Google Sheet with One Button Click

Google Sheets, Google Apps Script, GmailApp

Ever wanted a quick way to give edit permissions to a user and then send them an email based on values in your Google Sheet?

This task crosses my table several times a week. Whether it is sending reminders to complete a Google Sheets task or share a Google Sheet to complete a task.

You might be thinking that it’s pretty easy to just go up to the big green Share button on Google Sheets and plug in all the people you need to give edit permission too. But what if you need to give edit permission to a number of people that are on your Google Sheet. Ever noticed that the Share button gets in the way when you are looking through your Sheet for those names or emails?

When you normally share a Google Sheet you have the option to send a message, but what if you want to send a custom message with the user’s name? You are kinda stuck to a brief message which sucks.

So I decided that it would be best to create a template script that I could quickly adapt to suit my need in different circumstances.  Below is the result.

Basically, this little piece of Google Apps Script allows you  to plug in a custom:

  1. Email column.
  2. Columns you want to use to create a unique email for each person you want to send your message to.
  3. Email sent checkbox location
  4. An Image (I use a button) that the user can click on to send the email and give edit permission to the Spreadsheet.

Google Sheet necessary items for GAS email and share template

The script will then get all the emails and their associated columns you want to use to personalize your email. Remove the duplicates and then give permission to edit the current Google Spreadsheet and send them an email.

If you are in a hurry to copy and paste the code into your own project the script is below with a short Quick Start Guide.

If you are looking to learn how it all works, I will go into the details after the Quick Start Guide.

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Google Apps Script: Getting Selected Google Sheets Columns and Reducing them to a Unique Value Based on a Key Column

Google Apps Script, Google Sheets, getRangeList, 3D arrays

In a number of situations in my day-to-day work, I need to grab data from only Selected Columns in Google Sheets. Then using a selected column as a key, remove any duplicates in a similar way that a pivot table does.

I might want to use this information as part of a report or grab emails from a sheet and send custom emails to clients or staff.

I don’t always need all the data in each row, but I may need a lot of it. The two standard approaches would be to:

  1. Get all the data and then in Google Apps Script just select the relevant columns you need.
  2. Iterate through a list of columns you want to get ranges of and select each range individually making calls to your Google Sheet in each turn.

This might be useful for small data sets and, to be perfectly honest, I have used both these approaches in the past, but recently I stumbled across a method in the Google Apps Script Sheet Class called:

sheet.getRangeList([A1Notation,...,...])

Now I think that the awesome gods of GAS may not have purposed this method with the thought in mind that it would be used for collecting range values. I kinda get the impression that it was more designed for applying formatting to the selected column ranges.

However, what I have found is that it seems to be pretty fast at collecting all the ranges and then, on the Google Apps Script end, getting their values.

The resulting values of using getRangeList() can be then pushed into a 3D array of columns with row values.

For those of you in a hurry, the code is below. We will move on to an example and explanation after. Feel free to reference what you need and discard the rest.

The Code

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Google Apps Script: Maintain Row Heights When Copying and Pasting Data in Google Sheets

Google Apps Script: getRowHeight, setRowHeight

Copying and pasting data while maintaining row heights and widths can be a frustrating business in Google Apps Script. You see, there is a difference in how to set column width and set row heights.

Let’s say we have already copied our data over with something like:

sourceDataRange.copyTo(destination)

Google Apps Script provides us with a great set of enumerators for copying and pasting, the CopyPasteType.

To ensure that we maintain the same column width in our destination that was copied from our source, we need to run another copyTo() method of our sourceDataRange with the CopyPasteType.PASTE_COLUMN_WIDTHS. So all together it might look a little like this:

Okay, okay, a little extra work, but pretty straight forward. We get our column width in the end.

Now by this stage, you might be thinking, Yagi, why are you even blogging about this. Seems pretty straight forward, ya just gotta do the same with heights!

Nope. This is the point where we just have to remind ourselves that we love Google Apps Script for her flaws and all. Right? Right?!

For, I am sure, a very logical reason for the developers of Google Apps Script, copying and pasting the width has to be done row-by-row.

Here’s how you would do it the long way.

Scroll down to The Shortcut if you just want to copy and paste the functions into your code.

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